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The Waterfalls of Iguazu

Visiting Iguazu falls was one of the most memorable experiences from both my trips to South America. This is one of the most talked-about attractions in South America, and it excites the imagination with a tropical backdrop and endless falling water. Not only does it live up to the hype, but it also exceeds it. It is one of the few places in the world where the reputation is well earned. There are several hundred waterfalls here of various sizes, which act as the perfect build-up as you explore the National Park. The main attraction of Iguazu is the Devil’s Throat, the largest of the waterfalls, which you can hear roaring well before you see it.

There are three main walking circuits to explore; below the falls, above the falls and the catwalk to the Devil’s Throat. Along these elevated platforms, you are allowed you to pass over the top of each of these individual falls.It is certainly one of the most incredible natural wonders on the continent, well worthy of visiting (even if it means going out of your way). Today, we are going to showcase some photos from the first trip to Iguazu, back in 2005. Our second and most recent trip – Iguazu Falls National Park – took place in 2017, so this will be the second time we’ve shared some incredible memories from the falls.

The waterfalls at Iguazu are regularly considered on of the top five waterfalls in the world, alongside famous falls such as Niagara or Victoria Falls in Africa. We’re pretty sure after taking a look at the following evidence you will agree that it belongs up on the pedestal we just finished building.

What makes the Waterfalls of Iguazu so amazing?

There is something to be feared when this much potential energy transforms itself into such an incredible spectacle. Above the falls the water is calm, slowly marching towards the edge. Where the Iguazu River meets the Parana Plateau is where you can find the falls. There are several plateaus which the water tumbles over, and at this edge – which varies between 35 and 40 meters in height – is where this incredible attraction wows the viewer. The main attraction – the Devil’s Throat – drops between 80 – 90 meters.

The Devils throat. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.

There are many reasons why Iguazu is considered one of the most amazing attractions. The isolation, the surrounding jungles and the sheer volume of water have combined to create a wonderful natural wonder that can be enjoyed again and again. These photos were taken on a trip back in 2005, a journey in which we are revisiting today because we haven’t been able to travel this year and a need to keep that travel passion alive.

While on the Argentina side in Puerto Iguazu, there is a really great nearby spot where you can see the Iguazu and Parana Rivers meet, just downstream from the waterfalls. From the Brazil side, you can also visit the Itaipu dam, a massive hydroelectric project that is shared along the Brazil/Paraguay border and powers 25% and 75% of both of these countries power requirements.

Where are the Waterfalls of Iguazu and how do you get there?

The only problem with Iguazu is that they aren’t really “on the way” anywhere, so it will require a little bit of planning. Regardless of how you get there, make sure to keep this at the top of your list when planning, as it will not disappoint.

For me, both trips to Iguazu involved several long busses to get there, or a well planned flight (which in Argentina can often be similarly priced if you book in advance or travel during the off season). The overnight busses in South America are quite comfortable and combined with an overnight trip, can be a good way to double down and save yourself a night in the hotel.

Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.

This mind-blowing natural wonder, is shared between Brazil and Argentina, although Argentina has an unfair share of the over 200 waterfalls found inside the national park. Both countries however offer a unique viewing experience. Despite giving myself the opportunity to visit twice, both times I was only able to visit the Argentina side of the falls, once because of visa issues (Brazil visas are difficult to obtain in short notice) and the first time because of severe food poisoning. This sounds like tragedy, but it likely gives an excuse to visit one third and “final” time.

The Waterfalls of Iguazu

Rainbow. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Three Corners in Argentina (where Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina meet. 2005.
Rainbow. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Posing in front of the falls. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Itaipu Dam. Argentina / Paraguay. 2005.
Three Corners (where Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay meet). 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Devils throat. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Looking towards Brazil. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.
Devils throat. Iguazu Falls, Argentina. 2005.

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